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Each year, over 5% of American workers will experience a short-term disability due to illness, injury, or pregnancy.1 And disability often results in lost income and medical bills that can throw your financial plans off track, even if you’re only away from work for a short period of time. That’s why short term disability insurance is a vital protection to help ensure an illness or injury won’t permanently damage your financial confidence.

Here are the most important things you need to know before you start shopping for short term disability insurance policy.

What is short term disability insurance?

Disability insurance is sometimes referred to as income replacement because it pays you benefits to replace a portion of the income you lose if you’re unable to work due to a prolonged illness or injury. Short term disability insurance typically starts paying benefits within two weeks of a qualifying illness or injury and covers you for a benefit period that’s usually between 13-26 weeks. You’ll continue to receive benefits until you’re able to return to work or until you reach the end of your benefit period.

How does short term disability insurance work?

If you become too sick to work, or an injury keeps you out of work, and you have a short term disability policy in place, you’ll submit a claim along with information about your condition from your doctor. If your claim is approved, you’ll receive benefits until the end of the benefit period outlined in your policy. The money is paid to you directly, and there are no limitations on how it can be spent.

Why do you need short term disability insurance?

Medical expenses and job loss are two of the most common reasons individuals file for bankruptcy.2 If you lost your income because you were injured or became too sick to work, would you be able to cover your living expenses, plus additional medical bills? For most people, the answer is no. Short term disability helps cover the expenses that come with taking time off work to care for your health. Since short term disability is designed to replace a portion of your income for a short period of time, many people also choose a long term disability policy in case their illness or injury keeps them out of work for longer than their short term disability plan would cover them.

What conditions qualify for short term disability?

Cancer, pregnancy, mental health issues, injuries and musculoskeletal diseases are among the top reasons for disability claims. Coverage varies by policy, but your plan should outline if there are any conditions that would be exempt from coverage under your policy. Unlike Worker’s Compensation, short term disability insurance pays benefits for an injury or illness unrelated to your job. You can also purchase additional cancer, accident or critical illness insurance to supplement your short term disability benefits if you’re unable to work for one of those reasons.

What’s the difference between short term and long term disability insurance?

As the name indicates, short term disability insurance is intended to cover you for a short period of time following an illness or injury that keeps you out of work. While policies vary, short term disability insurance typically covers you for a term somewhere between 13-26 weeks and can replace anywhere from 40-70% of your income during that benefit period. If you have both short term and long term disability policies in place, short term disability will pay you benefits during the waiting period before your long term disability coverage begins, at which point you’ll transition from one policy to the next to receive benefits. For that reason, it makes sense to have both policies to help ensure an unexpected illness or injury won’t derail your financial confidence for a few months or for several years. 

What’s the difference between short term disability and temporary disability insurance?

Temporary disability insurance is offered to workers through a government program in some states . This insurance is meant to compliment worker’s compensation benefits by covering disabling illnesses or injuries that don’t happen at work or result from working conditions. Unlike short term disability insurance, it is only available in a handful of states. If you live in a state that offers temporary disability insurance, look into how much the benefit would pay to you compared to your expenses. If you determine that you would need more coverage, you may consider applying for a short term disability insurance to help make up for the gap in pay. If you don’t live in a state that offers temporary disability insurance, it will be that much more important to ensured you’re protected by a disability policy through your employer or purchased individually.

Unexpected Guardians: Two people talk disability

Sometimes the push we need comes from people we’ve never met. Two years ago, Jennifer lost her hearing and felt overwhelmed by all the challenges she suddenly faced. Then a conversation with a stranger gave her the push she needed.

 

What should you know when buying short term disability insurance?

Before you start shopping for short term disability insurance, check with your employer to see if a policy is available at work, and look into the disability benefits offered in your state, so you know whether to factor something like temporary disability insurance into your overall plan. When comparing policies, you should know how much income you’ll need to replace if you’re unable to work and how long you’ll need to receive benefits. If you have a long term disability policy in place, you’ll want to make sure that you’re short term benefits don’t run out before your long term benefits begins, so plan to have a short term policy that will cover you during the waiting period, or “elimination period,” in your long term policy.

Is short term disability insurance worth it?

Whether a short term disability policy is right for you is a decision only you can make. But considering that over 1 in 4 of today’s 20-year-olds will become disabled before they retire,3 having a short term disability policy in place can help you feel confident that you’re protected, whatever challenges life may bring. If you’re not sure how a short term disability policy will fit into your overall financial plan, talk with a financial professional who can help you figure out how to best protect yourself.

How do I get individual disability insurance?

If you’re self-employed, your employer doesn’t offer disability insurance, or you want to supplement the policy your employers does offer, you can apply for an individual disability policy. Individual disability insurance elimination and benefit periods may differ from group disability insurance plans, but a financial representative can help you choose the right coverage for your situation. If you’d like some help understanding what type of coverage makes sense for you and applying for a policy, get in touch with a financial representative who can help you make a decision.

If you’re not ready to speak to a financial representative, but you’re curious how individual disability insurance would fit into your financial plan, get a free quote now.

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Disclaimer

1

“Disability Statistics,” Disability Can Happen https://disabilitycanhappen.org/disability-statistic/ 2/20

2

“Top 5 Reasons People Go Bankrupt,” Investopedia https://www.investopedia.com/financial-edge/0310/top-5-reasons-people-go-bankrupt.aspx 2/12/20

3

“Chances of Disability,” Disability Can Happen https://disabilitycanhappen.org/overview/  2/20

Guardian’s Group Short Term Disability Insurance is underwritten and issued by The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America, New York,  NY.  Products are not available in all states.  Policy limitations and exclusions apply.  Optional riders and/or features may incur additional costs. Plan documents are the final arbiter of coverage. This policy provides disability income insurance only.  It does NOT provide basic hospital, basic medical or major medical insurance as defined by the New York State Department of Financial Services.

Policy Form # GP-1-STD-15.

Individual disability income products underwritten and issued by Berkshire Life Insurance Company of America (BLICOA), Pittsfield, MA. BLICOA is a wholly owned stock subsidiary of The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America (Guardian), New York, NY. Product provisions and availability may vary by state.

Links to external sites are provided for your convenience in locating related information and services. Guardian, its subsidiaries, agents and employees expressly disclaim any responsibility for and do not maintain, control, recommend, or endorse third-party sites, organizations, products, or services and make no representation as to the completeness, suitability, or quality thereof.

Prepared by The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America. The information contained in this article is for general, informational purposes only. Guardian, its subsidiaries, agents or employees do not give tax or legal advice. You should consult your tax or legal advisor regarding your individual situation.

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